A Video To Watch Later

siemari:

(x)

Dude ;3;

chels:

In this video clip, from the 1970 movie “Moon One,” we hear from the ladies who sewed the suits that protected the first men to walk on the moon. One of them started out sewing boxing gloves. I like hearing how excited they are about the idea of going to, and even living in, space. I don’t hear that much anymore. When I talk to people, they seem less enamored of the idea, less trustful of the possibility of safety. As a kid, space was always the place I wanted to go most. I’d still take a ride in a rocket any day, if it were offered. 

jtotheizzoe:

skunkbear:

Check out this video we made for NPR’s series on stress with animator Avi Ofer:

Applicable to my life this week

dougieplaysbanjo:

James Randi is a leader in the skeptical community who has been debunking paranormal and supernatural claims for most of his life. A magician himself James Randi is excellent at exposing the frauds that make up the paranormal and psychic communities. He offers a one million prize to anyone who can prove a paranormal claim scientifically and to this day nobody has won the money. Sylvia Browne has been ducking him for quite some time.

gameoflaughs:

Game of Thrones promo as if it were Princess Bride. I love both of these things, so this is perfect.

ucresearch:

The first computer mouse
Each time you click your mouse, you’re paying homage to a UC Berkeley engineering alum Douglas Engelbart.  Originally patented as the “X-Y Position Indicator for a Display System,” Engelbart invented and developed the first computer mouse. (It got its nickname “mouse” due to the cord attached to rear of the device that looked like a tail.)
Engelbart is known for giving “The Mother of All Demos" in 1968 — a live demonstration that featured almost all of the fundamental elements of modern computing: windows, hypertext, graphics, efficient navigation, command input, video conferencing and a collaborative real-time editor. 
Watch “The Mother of All Demos” →

ucresearch:

The first computer mouse


Each time you click your mouse, you’re paying homage to a UC Berkeley engineering alum Douglas Engelbart.  Originally patented as the “X-Y Position Indicator for a Display System,” Engelbart invented and developed the first computer mouse. (It got its nickname “mouse” due to the cord attached to rear of the device that looked like a tail.)

Engelbart is known for giving “The Mother of All Demos" in 1968 — a live demonstration that featured almost all of the fundamental elements of modern computing: windows, hypertext, graphics, efficient navigation, command input, video conferencing and a collaborative real-time editor.

Watch “The Mother of All Demos”

NEW DOCTOR WHO TRAILER

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Though we may not often consider it, our bodies are full of fluid dynamics. Blood flow is a prime example, and, in this video, researchers describe their simulations of flow through the left side of the heart. Beginning with 3D medical imaging of a patient’s heart, they construct a computational domain - a meshed virtual heart that imitates the shape and movements of the real heart. Then, after solving the governing equations with an additional model for turbulence, the researchers can observe flow inside a beating heart. Each cycle consists of two phases. In the first, oxygenated blood fills the ventricle from the atrium. This injection of fresh blood generates a vortex ring. Near the end of this phase, the blood mixes strongly and appears to be mildly turbulent. In the second phase, the ventricle contracts, ejecting the blood out into the body and drawing freshly oxygenated blood into the atrium. (Video credit: C. Chnafa et al.)